Get Galvanized

How to plant a rusty wheelbarrow for the garden

April-

After a trip over an old mine road near nowhere last April, Tractor Man and I stopped to follow this rusty cable. At the end of the ‘rusty brick road’ was OZ. A stunning treasure!

The holy grail for flea market gardeners

The holy grail for flea market gardeners.

How many people had passed this up after using it for target practice, I wonder? No Flea Market Gardener, I’m sure!  I know some here on our page who wouldn’t be above wheeling it away, running… There wasn’t a soul around that mine but a few ghosts and I STILL looked around to see if anyone was going to stop me.

We were near Coalinga, California, where ever that is, …a weird area desert like with a lot of benitoite in the soil.  A local man told us that because of all the minerals in the soil plants wouldn’t grow there,…that’s why the area looks like Utah desert.  We went there for the backroads and scenery. Believe me, this wheelbarrow was a GREAT scene!

Without question, my husband helped me heft it into the car,….I think even he admired the rusty patina, although he’s never used that word in his life. It will find a new home in my garden…   Bullet holes are good enough for drainage, right?

Later after stopping for dinner out and mid way through I gasped and told my hubby…”Oh My Gosh! We forgot the wheelbarrow in the truck,….what if someone steals it?!” He just looked at me….

OK, I’m happy.

May

Here it is in all its rusty bullet-holed glory!

All ready to plant

All ready to plant.

I LOVE it! Ready to plant, Autumn sage, ageratum and purple and magenta wave petunias. I’m not a petunia gal,…never have liked or grown them! BUT, one photo from our Spring Contest inspired me with this color combination, so I HAD to duplicate it. Any tips for me on petunias???

Petunias 101:  See all the tips YOU gave me!

Here’s my wheelbarrow all planted,…you can see where I moved my old wheelbarrow down further.

Newly planted with a few galvanized containers to match

Newly planted with a few galvanized containers to match.

Now, do I cut off the petunia flowers to make them fuller? Next photo not for a couple weeks,…hope it takes off. By the way, my inspiration was Shari McElhaney Telek’s petunia color combination in her “Celebrate Spring” contest photo. Thanks, Sheri! One of the nicest things about this page, I think, is when we get inspired by each other here and then act on it!

Shari Telek's photo and my inspiration

Shari Telek’s photo and my inspiration.

July

It’s mid summer and I thought I’d show the progress on my petunia planter wheelbarrow.

Mid summer and it's doing great

Mid summer and it’s doing great!

The deep blue and rose petunias, rose autumn sage and blue ageratum are filling in a bit. The galvanized tub below it has anemone which will bloom in the fall, and I just popped the Coreopsis ‘Rum Punch’ still in its nursery can into the bait bucket. I love it! I think I’m liking petunias now.

Categories: Creative Containers, Garden Art, Garden Junk, Garden Vignette, Gardening, Get Galvanized, Rusty Rust, Wonderful Wheelbarrows | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Galvanized tomato garden for one

Many people grow large vegetable gardens. I grow a small one that fits in five wash tubs.  It’s just the right size for two of us, since one of us doesn’t like tomatoes. This is a garden that a Flea Market gardener would love….I do!

Five galvanized tubs with drainage holes hold tomatoes, green onions and jalapeno peppers

Five galvanized tubs, with drainage holes, hold tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, green onions and jalapeno peppers.

For a good mix, I used one bag of each kind of soil at Home Depot just like is recommended in square foot gardening. The salesman there thought I was nuts, I think. I fertilize and watch for worms….didn’t find one, the healthiest I’ve ever seen,  until the end of the season.

Black Krim is the variety I grew this year, full bodied intensely sweet and inside, red, not black!

Black Krim is the variety I grew this year, full bodied intensely sweet and inside, red, not black!

Sweet 100s

Sweet 100s by the dozens…99 maybe.

Mini harvest for one

Mini harvest for one. My husband doesn’t like tomatoes. Most of the peppers I popped into a Zip-loc bag and froze. I then would add them to soups, spaghetti sauce and casseroles.

Watch for this guy, a tomato worm. They say these, (not this one), turn into hummingbirds moths.

Watch for this guy, a tomato worm. They say these, (not this one), turn into hummingbirds moths.

Some of the tomatoes, I dried and packed in jars of olive oil. See my recipe here.  ~~ Sue

Categories: Creative Containers, Edibles, Garden Junk, Get Galvanized, How to: Easy projects | 10 Comments

Tammy’s cottage garden of yesteryear

Part of the beauty of Tammy’s garden is like stumbling on a wee bit of rural England or maybe journeying back a century or two into simpler times. Another factor is how she captures the look with her camera. Look at these ancient looking vignettes containing  cottage garden plants like yarrow, coneflower, snapdragons, foxglove, lobelia and stock. Little birdhouses appear here and there.

Old enamel pan on a wooden stand is centered in the garden bed

A simple old enamel pan on a wooden stand is centered in the garden bed

Tammy’s ancient rusty wagon is filled with Mecardonia ‘Gold Dust’, Violet alyssum, and Euphorbia ‘Diamond Frost.’  In this photo below, the clay pots just glow and the handles of the garden forks echo the handle of the wagon.

Tammy's ancient rusty wagon

Tammy’s ancient rusty wagon

Against this weathered grey fence below, coneflowers and meadow sage hide a galvanized chicken feeder hung on a simple hook. Details in the background below are intriguing!  Thanks, Tammy!

A weathered fence is a backdrop for another vignette.

A weathered fence is a backdrop for another vignette.

Categories: Blue in the Garden, Creative Containers, Garden Art, Garden Junk, Garden Vignette, Get Galvanized, Recycling, Rusty Rust, Spring gardening | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Marie’s Rust Garden

One nice thing about our Flea Market Gardening companion blog, is that we can feature some big garden projects, step by step.

This May, Marie and Randy Niemann, of Ogden, Utah, embarked on an ambitious raised bed project which totally transformed their back garden and patio.  Here’s how they did it over just the last months.

Randy was the architect and muscle for the job, and Marie, a long time member of our Flea Market Gardening Facebook page was the ‘decorator’, embellishing the beds with her collection of Flea Market junkola. Marie certainly did her part of the construction, too, even though she needs to be careful of straining her back.  Here, she says, she laid out the general plan to change their lawn into four raised beds with brick paths between. They also wanted a seating area in which to relax, barbeque and sit and enjoy the garden’s progress.

Garden plan laid out with ribbon

Garden plan laid out with ribbon

In order to complete the job, they needed to rent equipment to do the heavy work, such as this Dingo, sort of a self-propelled push tractor. They also added water spigots and drip emitters to each bed for irrigation. Randy took a week off from work to devote to the project…what a guy!

Marie had to remove all the Flea Market finds

Marie had to remove all the Flea Market finds

First each laid out the plan, Marie with tape, Randy with flags,…just get the lines straight! You might see Marie’s Mr ‘T’ back there in the corner, a scarecrow Randy and Marie made of old Model T parts. He’ll supervise the job until he’s moved to the front yard to join Neighborhood Watch.

Randy removed the dirt with the 'Dingo'

Randy removed quite a bit of dirt with the ‘Dingo’

Nine yards of gravel

Nine yards of gravel!

Filling the space with a gravel base

Filling the space with a gravel base

Since Marie and Randy live at 4500 feet, they needed deep footing to run water pipes.

Leveling the area exactly

“More prep work, the area has to be perfectly level, a good foundation makes for a good end result.”

Marie has a tip, “The main rule of thumb is to have a good solid level foundation to get good results in the brick being level. I actually invented a little tool to help in measuring the tamped down gravel. It had to be perfect! I got tired of bending down measuring the depth for Randy. So I got a piece of white PVC pipe and spray painted the bottom three and a quarter inches florescent orange. Then it was simple to walk along to check the depth against the string to see if we were high or low. Don’t know if that’ll make sense, but I was happy with my invention that saved my back!”

Starting to build the planter boxes!

Starting to build the planter boxes from Randy’s design.

One box done, four to go

One box done, four to go. The blocks inside hold the planks together securely.

All six boxes built

All six boxes built, four large, two small.

“Looks like it is going to take a lot of dirt to fill the boxes now. Marie says, “We have some we saved to fill each one part way up, then add good rich soil hopefully weed free! I have a lot of sand left over, so I’m thinking of mixing some of that with this dirt. It should be easier on my back and also everything will be within reach from each side. I’m excited to get to them filled and get busy planting seeds and rust!”

***

Boy, that was a lot of work!  We are SO tired just watching you two do the heavy lifting…..

Laying pavers all day in the heat makes a guy dog gone tired

Laying pavers all day in the heat makes a guy dog-gone tired!

Marie says, “I don’t know why Scooter and Tucker didn’t go lay on the nice soft cool grass. Silly Boys!”  We say, “Pavers? The dogs or the bricks? My thoughts exactly! You need more dogs to pave this area.”

A truck load of good dirt

A truck load of good dirt

Now for the best part….dirt!

Ready to plant

Ready to plant.

Any gardener loves this sight….only we know the satisfaction and hard work it takes to get a garden bed to this point.  A blank canvas to ‘write’ on and Marie writes in RUST!

But oops,…not quite yet…

First things first before we plant we need water

First things first before we plant we need water.

Randy and Marie installed water lines to each box with drip lines for irrigation.

What are you planning to plant, Marie?

“Mainly veggies and will for starters use containers for flowers until I get a feel for how it’ll look! Before I had one small garden and one even smaller to plant and decorate. Now I’ll have to give this some thought with five!”

Finished raised bed garden

Finished raised bed garden, complete with the table and benches that Randy also made.

Marie says, “My hubby bought an umbrella for the picnic table he made, and I told him good job on the color! It’s the exact color of rust!”

It should be easier on my back and also everything will be within reach from each side. I’m excited to get to them filled and get busy planting seeds and rust!

Marie's junkola is ready to go in.

Marie’s junkola is ready to go in.

Funnel planters with baby wave petunia's started from seed

Funnel planters with baby wave petunia’s started from seed

A little more Rust, old bike and gate. That new windmill needs to age

A little more Rust, old bike and gate. That new windmill needs to age

Randy, taking a well deserved break with a Blue Bud.

Randy, taking a well deserved break with a Blue Bud.

View from the deck, July 3rd and things are growing and filling in

View from the deck, July 3rd and things are growing and filling in.

“I’m having a blast! It makes me so happy to finally be able to grow more veggies and enjoy my rusty treasures at the same time. I know we’ll be spending a lot more time outside now!” says Marie.

Salad Garden

Salad Garden, July 11

Pepper garden

Pepper garden

“This is the pepper garden with my favorite hanging funnel planters filled with wave petunias I grew from seed.” (see the picture above)

All photos are by Marie Niemann. More detail shots in the slideshow:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Categories: Edibles, Garden Art, Garden Junk, Garden Vignette, Gardening, Get Galvanized, My Big Garden Project, Recycling, Rusty Rust | 15 Comments

Annie’s galvanized “tipsy pots”

Galvanized tubs containers, combined with ‘tipsy pots’ is a genius idea and two of our favorite things at Flea Market Gardening!

Annie Steen has ‘upped the ante’ with her galvanized ‘tipsy pots’ and has added  water flowing from the middle tub pouring into a little stream that flows into her pond.

Annie's fabulous creation

Annie's fabulous creation

What is her secret?

First of all, inspiration from another FMGer, Jeanne Sammons who posted her galvanized tipsy pots last year here on Flea Market gardening. Annie says, “Here is my friend Jeanne Sammons ‘tipsy bucket planter… Isn’t it beautiful?”

Jeanne Sammons galvanized tipsys

Jeanne Sammons galvanized tipsys with beads for 'water!'

Annie Grossart-Steen says, “I put mine at the top of the waterfall of the pond, with clematis growing in the back…I have no idea whats going in them yet, but I have a few weeks to think about it. Thanks for the wonderful Idea!”

Annie’s ‘how-tos’

“The rod I used is a 1″ electric conduit steel pipe. I drilled holes in the buckets, ran a pipe through the bottom tub into the ground and stacked the buckets. The buckets are screwed to the center rod, and that rod goes through the bottom tub about 2 feet into the ground.”

Tipsy tubs, ready to be planted

Tipsy tubs, ready to be planted

Annie used a galvanized watering can, a coal bucket, two medium sized tubs and a large wash tub, drilling drainage holes in the bottoms.  Galvanized is a term used when  steel or iron has been coated with zinc to prevent rusting, and it’s just fine to plant in!

For terracotta tipsy pots, a rebar or other thin pipe is pounded into the ground about a foot, then the pots are threaded and tipped this way and that onto the bar. Soil is added and flowers planted.  Push the bar down into the top pot so it doesn’t show!

“This sits right at the top of the waterfall of the pond, and I ran a hose up to the coal bucket and the water pours right back into the pond. Can’t wait to see it planted with the water spilling over….am I crazy or what…” Annie asks.

Galvanized 'tipsy pots' Photo by Annie Steen

Galvanized 'tipsy pots' Photo by Annie Steen

Ann Elias also saw Jeanne’s idea and acquired the ‘raw materials’ needed.  She says, “After seeing the photo of Jeanne Sammons tipsy bucket planter…I had to go check out my stash in the backyard by the fence which I placed there last year.”

Ann Elias's 'tipsy pot-to-be'

Ann Elias's 'tipsy pot-to-be'

“I got these from my Mother-in-laws garage when getting her house ready for an estate sale. I have a watering can somewhere in the garage. I can’t wait to make one and plant it…and then bring my mother-in-law over to see what I did with her treasures. THANKS so much to everyone here for all the inspiration!” Ann says.

Thanks especially to Jeanne and Annie.  You’ll inspire many to do this project.  ~~ Sue

Categories: Creative Containers, Garden Art, Garden Junk, Get Galvanized, Recycling, Water feature, Weekend Project! | 15 Comments

Getting galvanized…in the garden

Sempervivum arachnoideum Hens and Chicks 'Cebenese' in an old bucket

Sempervivum arachnoideum Hens and Chicks 'Cebenese' in an old bucket

Galvanized metal is simply steel in some form that has received a thin coating of zinc oxide, which simply prevents containers from rusting when exposed to the elements. This makes it perfect as a planter for bright succulents or spring annuals on the patio.

This galvanized strainer pail, found at the Flea Market, is filled with Hens and Chicks ‘Cebenese’, Sempervivum arachnoideum. The little chicks have a spidery web attached to the spines. The muted coral of the blooms contrast well with the blue grey steel.

What about growing vegetables in galvanized tubs? Is it safe?
Johanna Silver, Sunset test garden coordinator says,

“All of the professors I tapped from UC Davis saw no problem with gardening in galvanized containers. …. Zinc, which is a trace chemical in the soil, poses little risk to the plants, and won’t accumulate to unhealthy levels for humans in the crops.”

So don’t worry if planting veggies; they’re perfectly safe and your galvanized tubs will be long lasting as well!

Osteospermum, Salvia 'May Night' and graniums in a galvanized palnter on wheels.

Osteospermum, Salvia 'May Night' and geraniums in a galvanized planter on wheels.

Set by the front door, this galvanized planter, found at a tag sale, is the perfect size and proportion and has the added advantage of having casters, so it can easily rolled away to sweep. Filled with seasonal flowers it brightens the entry! Next time you see galvanized containers of any size at the Flea Market, better gather them up and get galvanized!

Also see my galvanized tubs used as a vegetable garden and an onion farm!  For ALL our galvanized garden ideas, go directly to our Get Galvanized photo album on our FMG Facebook page.  ~~ Sue

Categories: Creative Containers, Garden Art, Garden Junk, Get Galvanized, Recycling | Tags: | 6 Comments

My galvanized wash tub garden

A year of gardening in my tub garden

These were found at an old junk yard.

These were found at an old junk yard.

I guess we at Flea Market Gardening all agree that we like galvanized anything!
These are the galvanized wash tubs I got at the old “Rust Brothers’ junk shop in Coarsegold down the road.  I don’t have a deer fence yet and the idea here is to grow a few veggies close to the house and hope the deer don’t get them.

June 12th
Three tomatoes, two peppers, Tractor Man wants green beans in one. I have each end of this area blocked off to deer, but they could come through the entry bed. I did get deer fencing to put up. I haven’t had veggies for so long because I haven’t had a deer fence, so this is fun!

i mixed all the different soils I had just like it says in the Square Foot Gardening book.

i mixed all the different soils I had just like it says in the Square Foot Gardening book.

July 1
My flea market ‘crops’ are twice the size from when planted June 12th!

Black Krimm. I had never tried this one,...it had a small yield.

Black Krimm. I had never tried this one,...it had a small yield, but it was a gift from a friend, so...

Sept 1
So, what do you put on besides tomato? For me, it’s good nutty wheat bread, 1/2 inch slices of tomato, buttery avocado slices and a bit of salt. Mayo, of course. What do you do?  I picked many peppers.  Huh?  And popped them into a zip loc bag in the freezer to use all winter.  Some I used fresh.  Did I mention that this is a garden on a SMALL scale?  Yes, if you have a small space or only want a few things for right now, easing into the whole veggie garden thing,…do try this!

I love this long row of Baby Sweet 100s

I love this long row of Baby Sweet 100s

Just one more ‘leetle babie’ tomato picture.

My 'harvest'

My 'harvest' ....I think I got about 4-5 baskets of tomatoes and hot peppers,...enough for two people, considering Tractor Man will not eat raw tomato.

Sept 12
See my cute little ‘harvest’ I have three tomatoes and two hot peppers plants still doing well in my galvanized tubs. They’re so sweet especially these.

Protected from deer?

Protected from deer?

See how, when we had to go out of town, I used my plastic outdoor chairs to block them off to any deer.  What,..am I delusional?  I saw no deer munching when we got home, so did it work….LOL!

Another basket to eat, dry or freeze

Another basket to eat, dry or freeze

The garden at the end of July

The garden at the end of July

I know some folks out there are canning and preserving, and soon I’ll be oven-drying a batch of these. I wrote a blog post recently on an easy way to do this. “How to Make Your Own Delicious Dried Tomatoes

Green onion bottoms

Green onion bottoms, 50 cents worth...

About halfway through summer, I poked in a few old green onions from the fridge,…poked ’em in around the peppers.  The green tops grew!  Read more about them here in , My green onion garden.  So I cut some of the growing tips while leaving the roots intact to grow more.  We’ve since learned you can do this with celery and garlic, too!

July 1

July 1st the onions are starting to grow

July 1st the onions are starting to grow

July 26

July 26th- The onions are shooting up!

The onions are shooting up!

The 'onion garden' in winter

The 'onion garden' in winter

Feb 15
Snow doesn’t seem to harm my winter ‘onion garden’ and I planted more this month!

Categories: Edibles, Gardening, Get Galvanized, How to: Easy projects | 7 Comments

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